Resignation Letter Samples: Quitting Because of Burnout

Resignation Letter Samples: Quitting Because of Burnout

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No job is a breeze, and there will always be stressful situations to battle through in the workplace. However, when the pressure becomes too much, and the stress is affecting your mental health, the best course of action may be to start writing a resignation letter and get out as soon as you can. 

To write a resignation letter due to stress or burnout, it’s important to be polite while being honest about your reason for leaving. Do not write the letter in haste, but wait until you have cooled down and are able to maintain a professional tone. Refrain from emotional language.

When things are going south at work, it can be tempting to use your resignation letter as a means to vent. However, doing so will only make things even worse. In the rest of this article, we will help you write a professional, honest, and polite resignation letter that will help you make a graceful exit from your stressful job.

Sample Letter #1: Quitting Due to Burnout 

According to the World Health Organization, burnout is a form of exhaustion common in the workplace that results from “chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed.” So when you are constantly swamped with things to do and you have deadlines that are impossible to meet, you are in perpetual work overdrive.

You have no room to breathe, relax, or even rest. 

Most people who get burnt out consider days off a luxury. And even if they do get a chance to go on that much-needed day off, their minds are stuck on work and dreading the coming of the next work day.

While pressure actually helps push us sometimes to perform much better than we would, there is no way we can sustain being under constant stress. We either decide to get away from what’s causing us unending stress, or it will break us.

If you’ve been feeling demotivated or lacking a desire to keep up with targets, quotas, and deadlines, even if there are reminders everywhere to let you know you’re lagging behind, you may be burnt out.

However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that quitting is the solution. It could be that it’s just a stressful season, and you know it won’t last forever. Or there could be ways for you to lessen your workload so you don’t feel like you’re drowning in your list of to-do’s.

Before deciding to quit, speak with your supervisor to let you know that the amount of pressure you’re under is causing you to feel burnt out. If you need to, you can also try asking for a break.

When you know that you’ve done everything to help ease the pressure from your shoulders and nothing is changing, or the pressure is increasing even more, it’s time to start writing your resignation letter.

Take a look at this sample letter:

John Smith

Human Resources Manager

ABC Company

Dear Mr. Smith,

I am writing to express my intention to leave my post as Sales Representative at ABC Company effective August 30.

Over the past months, I have been having a hard time keeping up with the pressures of the job. My workload has become overwhelming, and I’m finding it very difficult to reach my targets, as I am also handling ______ at the same time.

I feel that the demands of the job are too much for me to handle, which is making me unable to perform at my best.

Despite this, I am very grateful that you gave me a chance to work at ABC Company. I will be leaving with a great deal of experience. If there is anything I can do to help make this transition a smooth one, please feel free to let me know. 

Again, thank you for giving me the opportunity to work at ABC Company, and I wish you and the rest of the team all the best.

Sincerely,

Jane Doe

Sample Letter #2: Quitting Due to Health Issues

When the stress is too much, it will eventually show. In fact, stress is one of the most common causes of illnesses today. When we are under stress, our bodies respond with the flight-or-fight reaction, which is actually a way for our body to protect itself from a real or perceived threat.

There is a long list of physical symptoms that show your body is suffering from stress, and these symptoms can be emotional, behavioral, cognitive, or physical. 

Some of the most common stress symptoms are the following:

  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Chest pain
  • Insomnia
  • Inability to focus
  • Forgetfulness
  • Loss of appetite or overeating

When the stressful environment becomes unbearable, we become prone to more serious health problems, such as heart problems or clinical depression. It’s important to know when to take a step back or quit altogether.

If you are experiencing too much stress at work, speak with your HR personnel or your direct supervisor about it. Be honest about what’s causing the stress and what it’s doing to your health.

It can be tempting to gloss over certain issues, especially when you need to talk about workload, work culture, or work environment, but unless you are completely honest about it, they can’t offer a solution that may actually work.

If, however, you’ve tried explaining the situation to a person in authority and you understand that the work culture can’t change, you need to decide to leave the job to take care of yourself.

Here is a sample resignation letter that you can follow:

John Smith

Human Resources Manager

ABC Company

Dear Mr. Smith,

I am writing to express my intention to leave my post as Sales Representative at ABC Company effective August 30.

Over the past months, I have been having a hard time keeping up with the pressures of the job. My workload has become overwhelming, and I’m finding it very difficult to reach my targets, as I am also handling ______ at the same time.

I feel that the demands of the job are too much for me to handle, and being under constant stress is unfortunately now affecting my health. After a series of check-ups and tests, my doctor told me that the stress is indeed making me sick and that I need to take a break to take care of my physical well-being.

I would like to thank you for giving me a chance to work at ABC Company. I will be leaving with a great deal of experience, and for that I am grateful. If there is anything I can do to help make this transition a smooth one, please feel free to let me know. 

Again, thank you for giving me the opportunity to work at ABC Company, and I wish you and the rest of the team all the best.

Sincerely,

Jane Doe

Sample Letter #3: Quitting Due to Mental Health Issues

Being under too much stress can also affect our mental health. When you feel like no matter how hard you do your best, you aren’t good enough or can’t meet the targets or goals that you’re expected to, it can take a toll mentally.

In fact, two of the symptoms of being under chronic stress are feeling depressed and having low self-esteem. If you have ever dreaded going to work because you feel like you’re not good enough or because you’re ashamed that you’re not excelling, you might need to take a break.

You can speak with your boss about how you feel and try to request time off work if you think that will help you. 

However, if you’re struggling to even get out of bed, are constantly anxious about work, can’t stop worrying, and feel like you’re in a slump all the time, you might also need to speak with a professional who can help you through bouts of depression.

Don’t ignore the signs that your body is telling you to slow down. If you think that your job is causing any mental health issues, sometimes not even a break will do. Sometimes, you will need to quit, take time to recuperate, and find work that will not cost you a healthy state of mind.

If you feel that you need to quit your job now due to mental health issues, take a look at this sample resignation letter:

John Smith

Human Resources Manager

ABC Company

Dear Mr. Smith,

I am writing to express my intention to leave my post as Sales Representative at ABC Company effective August 30.

Over the past months, I have been having a hard time keeping up with the pressures of the job. My workload has become overwhelming, and I’m finding it very difficult to reach my targets, as I am also handling ______ at the same time.

I feel that the demands of the job are too much for me to handle, and being under constant stress is unfortunately now affecting my mental health. After several sessions, my psychiatrist told me that being under constant stress at work is one of the major reasons for my depression.

I would like to thank you for giving me a chance to work at ABC Company. I will be leaving with a great deal of experience, and for that I am grateful. If there is anything I can do to help make this transition a smooth one, please feel free to let me know. 

Again, thank you for giving me the opportunity to work at ABC Company, and I wish you and the rest of the team all the best.

Sincerely,

Jane Doe

Tips on Writing a Resignation Letter Due to Burnout

Writing a resignation letter can be challenging whatever the reason, but it is especially so when the reasons are sensitive or related to work culture and environment. To help you write a good resignation letter when you’re burnt out, follow these tips:

  • Speak to your supervisor before deciding to quit. Sometimes, quitting is not the answer. Your judgment may simply be clouded because of raging emotions and too much pressure. So before you start typing away, schedule a sit-down with your boss first.
  • Write with a cool head. If you’re angry, frustrated, or bitter about anything, write the letter another time. It may only cause you to write things that you will regret later on.
  • Maintain a professional tone. As much as you can, keep the letter formal and professional. Stay away from emotional words like “angry” or “disappointed”. Be as objective as possible.
  • Be respectful but honest. In aiming to be polite, don’t forget to be honest. Write the real reason why you’re leaving. This will help your boss understand your predicament better and may even cause them to make the work environment better for those who are still on board.

Final Thoughts

Stress will always be a part of work. But you know best just how much pressure and stress you can handle. While excelling at work is great, it shouldn’t come at the cost of your well-being and mental health.

Writing a polite, professional, and honest resignation letter when you know you can’t handle any more pressure or stress is one step closer to taking control of your personal well-being while maintaining a good relationship with the colleagues that you leave behind.

Sources

About The Author

Nathan Brunner
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Nathan Brunner is a mathematician who cares about the job market.

He is the owner of Salarship, a job search engine where less-skilled candidates can find accessible employment opportunities.