Resignation Letter Samples: Quitting for a Better Opportunity

Resignation Letter Samples: Quitting for a Better Opportunity

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When we feel like we’re no longer growing or learning in our careers, it’s normal to want to look for better opportunities elsewhere. Unfortunately, quitting can be an awkward ordeal, especially if you’re unsure of how to make your intentions known to your employer. 

When writing a resignation letter to quit for a better opportunity, it’s important to be brief, polite, and clear. This will allow you to leave your current company gracefully and maintain a good relationship with your employer and colleagues. 

Writing a resignation letter that leaves a positive impression can be challenging. So if you’re struggling to put your thoughts on paper, I’ll give you some tips on how to do so, as well as provide resignation letter samples that you can use as templates.

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Sample #1: Quitting for a Better Opportunity

Ideally, you’ll have received a new job offer before sending in your resignation letter. If you’ve been feeling unfulfilled or like you’ve not been given enough opportunities for growth at your current job, it’s normal to start considering a new position.

If you’ve been able to prove your value and skills in your industry, you may even no longer have to actively look for work–it may simply come to you. Hiring managers are always on the lookout for new talent and promising individuals, so the better your work credentials and portfolio, the better your chances of having an offer come to you.

If you fall under this category, congratulations! It’s an exciting time in your career. But before packing up and hitting the door, remember to make your exit a graceful one. This starts with writing a well-crafted resignation letter.

Here is a useful sample if you want to write a resignation letter for a better opportunity:

Dear Mr. Smith,

I am writing to express my intention to leave my post as Administrative Clerk at ABC Company effective August 30 (give at least a two weeks notice period).

I have received a job offer from another company that I believe will help me grow professionally and is more aligned with my skills and desired career direction. 

Working at ABC Company has been a pleasant experience, and I am grateful to have gained so much valuable knowledge. Thank you for your support throughout my employment.

If there is anything I can do to help make this transition a smooth one, please feel free to let me know. 

Again, thank you for giving me the opportunity to work at ABC Company, and I wish you and the rest of the team all the best.

Sincerely,

Jane Doe

Sample #2: Quitting for a Better Opportunity (With Higher Salary)

While there’s no such thing as the perfect job, it takes one that pays well and that allows for professional growth to make people stay. The reality is that no matter how great it is to have the opportunity to learn new things and advance professionally, if your job doesn’t pay well enough for you to make ends meet, you’ll have to look for another that can.

Before deciding to quit, though, make sure to discuss your situation with your boss. Your circumstances may have changed so that the compensation you had initially agreed upon is no longer enough to support you and your family. Be polite but honest. You’ll never know–your boss might just give you a raise and you won’t have to resign after all.

However, if you have already brought your concern to your boss’s attention and yet nothing is changing or they tell you that a raise is just not possible at the moment, then it may be time to seek other opportunities that will allow you to meet your financial obligations.

Here is a sample resignation letter if you want to quit due to a low salary:

Dear Mr. Smith,

I am writing to express my intention to leave my post as Administrative Clerk at ABC Company effective August 30 (give at least a two weeks notice period).

While working at ABC Company has been a pleasant experience and I am grateful to have gained so much valuable knowledge, I am forced to seek other opportunities that will allow me to meet my financial needs.

As I mentioned during our discussion, my financial obligations have increased, and I unfortunately am not able to meet these demands with the salary that I currently receive. I understand that a raise is not possible at the moment.

I am sad that I have to leave such an amazing work environment, but I look forward to exploring other opportunities where I will be able to support myself and my family.

If there is anything I can do to help make this transition a smooth one, please feel free to let me know. 

Again, thank you for giving me the opportunity to work at ABC Company, and I wish you and the rest of the team all the best.

Sincerely,

Jane Doe

Sample #3: Quitting for a Better Opportunity (With More Professional Growth)

No matter how much we enjoy our job, if we’re not growing professionally, we will end up feeling demotivated and unfulfilled. It’s important for us to feel like our work has a purpose beyond helping us make ends meet.

So if you have talked to your supervisor about feeling a lack of opportunity to grow professionally and yet you’re not being given a break or even a chance to prove yourself, then it might be time to make your exit.

In this case, you may be bitter or even angry towards your boss, which you may be tempted to show in your resignation letter. No matter how badly you feel, though, it’s always best to keep your resignation letter polite and positive, especially if you want to continue to work in the same industry.

You never know who your boss’s connections are–you may end up needing them or working with them in the future.

Take a look at this resignation letter sample if you want to quit due to a lack of professional growth:

Dear Mr. Smith,

I am writing to express my intention to leave my post as Administrative Clerk at ABC Company effective August 30 (give at least a two weeks notice period).

While working at ABC Company has been a pleasant experience and I am grateful to have gained so many valuable skills, I feel that I am not growing professionally. I have expressed my desire to be given a higher level of responsibility over the course of my employment, but I understand that my position here cannot accommodate it.

I am sad that I have to leave such an amazing work environment, but I look forward to exploring other opportunities for career growth.

If there is anything I can do to help make this transition a smooth one, please feel free to let me know. 

Again, thank you for giving me the opportunity to work at ABC Company, and I wish you and the rest of the team all the best.

Sincerely,

John Doe

How to Write a Formal Resignation Letter for a Better Opportunity

Crafting a proper resignation letter before leaving a company is one way to show respect to your current employer as well as ensure that no bridges are burned upon your exit. Maintaining good relationships with past employers and colleagues will prove helpful as you expand your connections and maintain positive relationships in your chosen industry.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when writing a resignation letter.

Express Your Gratitude

Whatever your reasons for leaving, your current employer gave you an opportunity to work, make a living, and pursue your chosen career. So don’t forget to be thankful for the fact that they considered and accepted you in the first place.

When writing your resignation letter, think of the things that you appreciate about your work, your superior, and your colleagues, and point them out. This is especially helpful to balance out your reason for quitting.

The last thing that you want your letter to be is complaint-focused. Remember that your letter will most likely be your last formal correspondence with your employer or superior, and you want it to be a positive one.

Be Respectful

You may have real and valid complaints, but you can be honest about your reasons for leaving without being disrespectful. Try your best to write your thoughts in a way that will convey your message clearly while being polite. 

You will achieve nothing by antagonizing your boss or your colleagues in your letter. If there are vital or sensitive issues that you want to raise with your superior, you can do so in person instead. 

Be Clear

Lastly, make sure that your letter is clear. Include your last day of work, explain why your new job is a better opportunity, and add any other details that will be helpful for the transition. Do this politely while being straight to the point. 

Your honesty will not only help your employer work to improve gaps in the workplace but also better equip them and your replacement to handle the transition phase.

Final Thoughts

Writing a resignation letter is almost always challenging. But as long as you make your exit well, you’ll be able to maintain a good relationship with past colleagues, expand your network, and equip yourself to start fresh on a better, more fulfilling opportunity.

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